First Camping Trip, Part 2

Even though Tettegouche State Park was beautifully rugged, I enjoyed the views on the second day of our trip even more. Our destinations were more easily accessible, so it made the whole pace of the day more leisurely. Even though we visited two different parks, our walks were shorter and easier, giving us more time and energy to just soak up all the beauty of the area.

Our first stop was Split Rock Lighthouse State Park. The lighthouse was built in 1909 and protected sailors from the rocky shoreline for 59 years. It is now one of the most photographed lighthouses in the country.

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The lighthouse sits on the edge of the rocky bluff in the picture above. It cost an extra $10/ adult to get anywhere near the lighthouse so we contented ourselves with the distant views. Besides, we were a bit distracted by Lake Superior’s almost vacant and absolutely gorgeous rocky beaches.

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Roland put his crazy three- year- old energy to use and spent his time running away from the waves (although, his timing was not perfect and he ended up pretty wet by the time he was done). I on the other hand, seated myself down on the rocks, basked in the warm sunshine and lost myself in the sounds of the lake. I decided that there are few things in this world that will take your cares away more than the rhythmic sounds of waves crashing on the shore and then receding back over the rocks.

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A lake is the landscape’s most beautiful and expressive feature. It is earth’s eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature.

~Henry David Thoreau

Our second stop for the day was Gooseberry Falls State Park. This park was not only very pretty, but it was also much more fun to explore than I was expecting. A network of stairs takes you by Upper, Middle, and Lower Falls. At the bottom of each waterfall there are large areas of flat rocks and shallow streams of water that were perfect for playing. The landscape was so interesting; the water had carved out little arches and caves in the rocks so you never knew what unique feature you were going to come across next. Gooseberry Falls is the closest state park on Lake Superior to Duluth so there was a large number of visitors there, but there were enough nooks and crannies for everybody to find their own little spot to explore.

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The photo below gives a good overview of the area’s landscape. You can see people playing on the rocks and shallow water between the waterfalls. The blue in the background is Lake Superior.

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We were able to finish our day’s activities early enough to get back to our campsite and have a campfire. A little bit after the mandatory s’mores eating was done, I looked up into the clear night sky and saw that the northern lights were hovering right above us. We watched the dancing white streaks in the sky until our necks were sore. They weren’t as amazing as the ones we have witnessed while living in Alaska, but it was special all the same. Maybe even more special since seeing the aurora borealis outside of Alaska is more rare and this was the first time Matt, Roland and I have watched one together. It felt like a special little blessing from God, just for our family. It was a perfect end to our first camping trip together.

First Camping Trip, Part 1

I grew up camping. Every break from school my parents would hook up the pop- up camper and we would hit the road. We lived in Miami, but I ended up seeing and appreciating many places throughout the country that my classmates knew very little about. Camping and travelling with my family are my happiest childhood memories. Ever since I became an adult and got married, I longed to share those experiences with my children. It has been a long wait (many years of infertility issues and then a 3.5 year long adoption), but my husband and I finally took our son, Roland, on his first camping trip.

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We took our maiden trip as a family of three to Minnesota’s North Shore of Lake Superior. Most of Minnesota is city, farmland, or forest (and lakes) and the scenery does not change very quickly. It was nice to leave the flat, boggy forests of the Bemidji area for a couple days and enjoy views of some vast open water.

We camped at Jay Cooke State Park, which is just south of Duluth, and worked our way up the first 60 miles of the North Shore. It is 150 miles from Duluth to Canada and 1,300 miles if you want to drive the whole perimeter of Lake Superior, which happens to be the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area. We did cram a lot into our two day trip, including four different state parks, but we saw only a small section of this impressively large lake.

Jay Cooke State Park turned out to be not only a convenient, but also a scenic base camp for us. The St. Louis River, Lake Superior’s largest U.S. tributary, runs through the park. As we walked over the suspension bridge, we enjoyed views of rugged rocks and rapids.

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On our first day we drove to Tettegouche State Park and “oohed and aahed” over the views of Lake Superior along the way. We only had one day to enjoy this large and diverse park so we focused on the highlights: views of the lake and Minnesota’s highest waterfall. First, we trudged up the many stairs to Shovel Point and we were rewarded with a view of Lake Superior’s intricately jagged shoreline.

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On the way back down the stairs, we decided to go down even more stairs to reach the lake shore. We found a pretty little cove and enjoyed it all to ourselves.

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By this point we were already getting a little tired of stairs so we were less than thrilled that our next hike also consisted of mostly stairs. The lure of High Falls kept us motivated, though. There was no way we were going to miss the highest falls in the state. The lovely High Falls drops 60 feet before flowing into the Baptism River, which eventually makes its way to Lake Superior.

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We ended up walking around 4.5 miles, most of which was going up and down stairs. We got plenty of exercise, fresh air, and beautiful views (and our 3- year- old son did very little whining on the longest hiking day of his life!). Challenging your body to see something new and wonderful is always satisfying. We thoroughly enjoyed Tettegouche and we were thoroughly worn out by the end of the day, but we were excited about what adventures lay ahead on our last day on Lake Superior.

We travel not to escape life, but for life not to escape us.

-Anonymous